Wroxton Abbey History Gallery

This gallery of images takes you through the history of Wroxton Abbey and its tenants the Lords North, as well as the village of Wroxton.

3 thoughts on “Wroxton Abbey History Gallery

  1. Eric Webb

    My great-grandfather George Cadd (1848 – 1929) is said to have been the last lodge-keeper at Wroxton House before the Norths sold up. My mother (b. 1918) recalls Christmas parties for the village children held there – this would have been in the 1920s – any photos? I’d be most grateful. My grandparents Frank & Lilian Cadd attended Lord North’s grand 90th birthday party in 1926 but I cannot identify them in the photo published. Are there others?

    I can also recount a family tale! It is said that after the Great War there came to Wroxton a new vicar, Rev. Dickens, full of socialist ideals, who decreed that the Church bells should no longer ring on Lord North’s birthday. Come 1930 5th October fell on the Sunday of the Harvest Festival. The matter was discussed at a Church Council Meeting, Rev. Dickens’ view prevailed and the bell-ringers were instructed that they could not ring for Lord North, to whom they all owed a great deal. They decided that if that was the case they would not ring for Harvest Festival either. My Grandfather Frank Cadd who was then choirmaster had to convey their decision (which I suspect he strongly approved!) to the Vicar. The story made headlines in the local weeklies and a peal was instead rung for Lord North in St. Mary’s Church Banbury. Rev. Dickens then dismissed grandfather from his position!

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  2. Simon Wadsworth

    My great-great grandfather was the Gamekeeper at Wroxton Abbey from 1870 to at least 1885. His name was Simeon Frost. He was married and had at 3 daughters, and maybe a son. I still have a silver cup presented to him in 1885, “By the gentleman and inhabitants of the borough of Wroxton. As a mark of esteem and regard.” Do you have any pictures or records of him please?

    Many thanks,
    Simon Wadsworth

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    1. Howard Goldbaum Post author

      I’m sorry, but I believe the earliest photographs we have are from the 20th century. But thank you for the interesting Wroxton detail.

      Reply

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